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are playacting. but as i'll explain, it's no game. >> he used to be a hospital patient. now he's a hospital hero. i'll have that story. >> a cooking competition so fierce you can taste it. i'll report on teen chefs. >> rugby started in england long ago. no doubt the inventors of the sport would be surprised to see how it's now being played in america. >> we asked teens if they'd like to sit at this desk and handle all the responsibilities that come with it. their answers may surprise you. >> we're at madame tussauds new york getting a behind-the-scenes peek at all the work it takes to keep these life-size wax figures looking lifelike. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> bullying is making a lot of news nowadays. that's because it's so common. brandon tells us about an unusual program that's helping to prevent bullying. not only does it start in elementary school, it takes an approach that's rather dramatic. >> hey, listen. i wanted to talk to you about the math, 'cause... >> liz and rache
students know about our u.s. history at grades 4, 8, and 12. everything from the united states constitution to presidents to why certain laws came into play. at very different levels, there are certain questions that are asked. the 8th graders really were the ones who did, i would say, perform the best when we consider the 4th and we consider the 12th grade. >> that's because 8th graders' scores improved over the last time the test was given. 4th graders and 12th graders did not. in fact, a majority of 12th graders turned in a poor performance. their questions were harder, and their correct answers were fewer. 55% of 12th graders scored below the basic level. what does this show? >> mm, lauren, that's not good news at all. [ chuckles ] and what does that mean for our 12th graders? it means that we have to find a way to engage our 12th graders in learning u.s. history. we have to make it more important to them. so, we have a lot of work to do, definitely, at the 12th-grade level. >> there's a famous saying -- "those who don't know history are condemned to repeat it." so, the lessons of the p
, is happening to us. whatever's happening in the asian community, that's us. instead of possessive commodified investment in our identities, we need to take possessive investment in our other communities' struggles. >> the life and work of junot diaz contain many worlds, and that makes him all the more worth listening to. his imagination travels between the old and the new, between the america that was and the america we're becoming. straddling different cultures, yet american to the core -- he seems to be looking in every direction at once -- a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man very much of the here and now. in his first book, "drown" and in "the brief wondrous life of oscar wao" -- the novel that won him the pulitzer prize, diaz writes in short, vivid strokes of realspeak. his recent collection of short stories, "this is how you lose her," was a finalist for the national book award. diaz, the novelist, once considered becoming an historian and to this day he summons his creative gifts by looking to his own past. he was born in the dominican republic, part of that caribbean
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3